mikerugnetta:

benningtoncollege:

Faculty Member Nick Brooke talks about how he thrives and challenges himself as a musician.

Yay! Nick! Nick was my composition instructor and he changed my life. This man is a saint and a genius. For a few years after college I had the pleasure of working with him on a bunch of his performance pieces, all of which are mind blowing and unlike anything I’d seen before or since. 

There are a couple of these videos, of him talking about teaching at Bennington. They’re short and specific but interesting. However, I am the most biased you could possibly be.

librarianreadseverything:

This was probably the hardest 100-page book I’ve ever read. Without chapters, and consisting of approximately four total paragraphs, you never really got a sense of breakpoints in the stories. There was literally no pause from one piece to the next, so you couldn’t really catch your breath and review the last passage before heading into the next. It just all unraveled before you, and therefore I feel this book is best read in one long sitting. 
The deathbed styling is intriguing, and if you have a brief knowledge of Chilean history, the book becomes much more revealing. Even a passing wiki knowledge of the fall of Allende and the rise of Pinochet will help. 
Overall the writing was beautiful, but as I said, it was very difficult to get a sense of plot because of that same style.
Book 14 of 189

librarianreadseverything:

This was probably the hardest 100-page book I’ve ever read. Without chapters, and consisting of approximately four total paragraphs, you never really got a sense of breakpoints in the stories. There was literally no pause from one piece to the next, so you couldn’t really catch your breath and review the last passage before heading into the next. It just all unraveled before you, and therefore I feel this book is best read in one long sitting. 

The deathbed styling is intriguing, and if you have a brief knowledge of Chilean history, the book becomes much more revealing. Even a passing wiki knowledge of the fall of Allende and the rise of Pinochet will help. 

Overall the writing was beautiful, but as I said, it was very difficult to get a sense of plot because of that same style.

Book 14 of 189

Reblogged from librarianreadseverything

Anonymous asked:

So lets pretend I lost my schedule? That would be crazy am I right! Who can I email/call to get a new copy?

benningtonstudents answered:

Man, what a hugely implausible scenario.  You’ve given all of us in the office a good laugh, to think that could ever happen.  But, hypothetically… you could go to https://bennington.populiweb.com/ and log in using your bennington email.  Your schedule would be on the right under “Courses,” and you could click on each course and look on the right to see when it’s being held.  Hypothetically.

-Ray ‘15

Another awesome Ray Response :-)

staff:

supersmashthestatebros:

image

hmmmm yeah, tumblr would celebrate Aviation Day, marking barely over a century of human flight when birds had been flying for millions of years before the Wright brothers. never forget.

Tumblr hereby recognizes the accomplishments of birds. 

Oh c’mon! The first time a bird posts on Tumblr, there’ll be a big frickin whoop-di-do, and I guarantee nobody comes on and talks about how humans have been posting on Tumblr for years before a bird pecked out a message about taking a poop on my car.

librarianreadseverything:

A really wonderful bit of poetry.
There was a book I read a number of years ago called “The Missing Piece” (no, not that one.) It was about a world where solving jigsaw puzzles was a major sporting event. It got really detailed into the act of doing jigsaw puzzles and the different strategies people used to solve them. I imagine many of these strategies are real, and there are probably small circles and groups where people get deeply into jigsaw puzzles in this manner.
I mention the book because Maggie Nelson does the same thing with the color blue. Besides the use of the color as a metaphor, she draws out quotes and history and science about the color. She draws inspiration and sadness from it. It becomes the focal point. And she delves so deeply that you are pulled with her and sorta see, in a hazy way, what that sort of love for a color would feel like.
Book 13 of 189

librarianreadseverything:

A really wonderful bit of poetry.

There was a book I read a number of years ago called “The Missing Piece” (no, not that one.) It was about a world where solving jigsaw puzzles was a major sporting event. It got really detailed into the act of doing jigsaw puzzles and the different strategies people used to solve them. I imagine many of these strategies are real, and there are probably small circles and groups where people get deeply into jigsaw puzzles in this manner.

I mention the book because Maggie Nelson does the same thing with the color blue. Besides the use of the color as a metaphor, she draws out quotes and history and science about the color. She draws inspiration and sadness from it. It becomes the focal point. And she delves so deeply that you are pulled with her and sorta see, in a hazy way, what that sort of love for a color would feel like.

Book 13 of 189

Reblogged from librarianreadseverything