librarianreadseverything:

Before you open the front cover of the book, make sure you have one hour you can devote to reading, no more, no less. Read for one hour straight. If, at the end of the hour (depending on your reading speed and how many times you flip backwards in the book), you have NOT reached page 50 or so, you must schedule another reading session until you reach page 50. By the time you reach page 50, you’ll read until the very end.
I say one hour because otherwise you’ll willingly give up reading this book after the first few pages, it’s just that confusing. And by the time you get to page 50, you’ll understand the style and won’t want to stop reading.
Is The Time Traveller’s Wife a science fiction book with a romantic plot tucked inside? Or a love story with sci-fi features? Or a philosophy book encompassing all of the above? And when a book is this friggin’ good, does it matter how it’s classified?
Now, you can’t judge this book by the movie. It’s way too easy to boil this 500-page book down to 2 hours of sap. But in the confines of the larger work, those sappy parts play out naturally and nicely. I had to keep putting down the book over the last 100 pages not because I didn’t want to finish it, but because I knew what was coming and I just wasn’t prepared to face it.
A really fantastic read, very well done plot and great writing.
Book 28 of 189

librarianreadseverything:

Before you open the front cover of the book, make sure you have one hour you can devote to reading, no more, no less. Read for one hour straight. If, at the end of the hour (depending on your reading speed and how many times you flip backwards in the book), you have NOT reached page 50 or so, you must schedule another reading session until you reach page 50. By the time you reach page 50, you’ll read until the very end.

I say one hour because otherwise you’ll willingly give up reading this book after the first few pages, it’s just that confusing. And by the time you get to page 50, you’ll understand the style and won’t want to stop reading.

Is The Time Traveller’s Wife a science fiction book with a romantic plot tucked inside? Or a love story with sci-fi features? Or a philosophy book encompassing all of the above? And when a book is this friggin’ good, does it matter how it’s classified?

Now, you can’t judge this book by the movie. It’s way too easy to boil this 500-page book down to 2 hours of sap. But in the confines of the larger work, those sappy parts play out naturally and nicely. I had to keep putting down the book over the last 100 pages not because I didn’t want to finish it, but because I knew what was coming and I just wasn’t prepared to face it.

A really fantastic read, very well done plot and great writing.

Book 28 of 189

Reblogged from librarianreadseverything

librarianreadseverything:

How fast can you grow up? Are you an adult when the state tells you, at 18 or 21? Are you an adult when you hit puberty? Or did you have adulthood forced upon you before you had a chance to prepare? Rory never gets the opportunity to experience childhood. Besides the *REDACTED TEXT* that forces adulthood on her, she’s become an adult through the loss of childhood by her mother and grandmother. She grows up in the shadow of their losses, and ages quicker than most of us ever will. The title, girlchild, is almost mocking because Rory is never a child. Never has the adage age is just a number been more true. Your heart will ache for Rory Dawn, and Tupelo Hassman should be applauded for her ability to write so well.
Book 27 of 189

librarianreadseverything:

How fast can you grow up? Are you an adult when the state tells you, at 18 or 21? Are you an adult when you hit puberty? Or did you have adulthood forced upon you before you had a chance to prepare? Rory never gets the opportunity to experience childhood. Besides the *REDACTED TEXT* that forces adulthood on her, she’s become an adult through the loss of childhood by her mother and grandmother. She grows up in the shadow of their losses, and ages quicker than most of us ever will. The title, girlchild, is almost mocking because Rory is never a child. Never has the adage age is just a number been more true. Your heart will ache for Rory Dawn, and Tupelo Hassman should be applauded for her ability to write so well.

Book 27 of 189

Reblogged from librarianreadseverything

librarianreadseverything:

This is just a fantastic run through what it means to live. Cameron is a teenager diagnosed with Mad Cow Disease (BSE) and has two weeks to confront the mystery of life. The characters are alternatively sardonic and upbeat, as they go along for the ride with Cameron. The flashes between the current setting and the hospital leave you wondering what’s real, while simultaneously letting you just enjoy the ride. But the question is always there, are you living or are you just existing?
Book 26 of 189

librarianreadseverything:

This is just a fantastic run through what it means to live. Cameron is a teenager diagnosed with Mad Cow Disease (BSE) and has two weeks to confront the mystery of life. The characters are alternatively sardonic and upbeat, as they go along for the ride with Cameron. The flashes between the current setting and the hospital leave you wondering what’s real, while simultaneously letting you just enjoy the ride. But the question is always there, are you living or are you just existing?

Book 26 of 189

Reblogged from librarianreadseverything

librarianreadseverything:

After reading Faust, it’s nice to get back into a book that doesn’t require the entirety of my being to read. To slip back into a book that makes it easy on the mind is a nice pleasure. 
The book touches on some really interesting ideas regarding mental illness - what is “sanity”, how to treat mental illness, whether there is a cure or whether a matter of managing the symptoms. And it also touches on the broader idea of understanding who you are and who you want to be. Kaysen mixes the timeline so you get flashes of her future talking about marriage and divorce, etc. and then back to her past talking about going to college. What you’re left with is what feels like the multiple roads we can travel in life. And it’s relatable because we all have that same question of where are we going. She was 17/18 with those questions, and I’m 34 with those same questions. 
I went into this book expecting I’d get less out of it than I did, and it was a very pleasant surprise.
Book 25 of 189

librarianreadseverything:

After reading Faust, it’s nice to get back into a book that doesn’t require the entirety of my being to read. To slip back into a book that makes it easy on the mind is a nice pleasure. 

The book touches on some really interesting ideas regarding mental illness - what is “sanity”, how to treat mental illness, whether there is a cure or whether a matter of managing the symptoms. And it also touches on the broader idea of understanding who you are and who you want to be. Kaysen mixes the timeline so you get flashes of her future talking about marriage and divorce, etc. and then back to her past talking about going to college. What you’re left with is what feels like the multiple roads we can travel in life. And it’s relatable because we all have that same question of where are we going. She was 17/18 with those questions, and I’m 34 with those same questions. 

I went into this book expecting I’d get less out of it than I did, and it was a very pleasant surprise.

Book 25 of 189

Reblogged from librarianreadseverything

librarianreadseverything:

There’s two competing factions in the Librarian Reads Everything project. On the one side is the want to really delve into a book, explore its nuances, and try to see it from the recommender’s perspective. The other side is the knowledge that to read 189 books in just over 9 months means I have to complete each book in approximately 1.5 days. Pause for a second and read that last sentence again. Each and every book, in 1.5 days.
Keeping that in mind, there are times that even allowing for extra time to read a book, like Faust, I can’t possibly get in depth as the person who recommended it. I read this book in about 4-5 days (in which I should have read it, and two others) and so it completely swamped me.
I really enjoyed the first parts, which is the more well-known of the two parts. The second part, dealing with the ancient Greeks, was much harder to get through because I didn’t have as in-depth a knowledge of Greek mythology. And that speaks to another advantage the recommenders have over the reader. Particularly with academic works, the recommender usually reads them through with their class, so they benefit from the discussion that goes on with their classmates and their teacher. The entire group is able to bring out certain plot points, notable references, and then loop back to earlier passages to combine these elements. Reading alone, it’s hard to tie it all together.
This is all to say that Faust, while certainly an interesting and seminal work, is best read in a group setting. It brought back fond memories of my own high school english courses and taking the time to really delve into the classics. While I enjoy personal reading and this project, there are definitely times where I miss collaborative reading.
Book 24 of 189

librarianreadseverything:

There’s two competing factions in the Librarian Reads Everything project. On the one side is the want to really delve into a book, explore its nuances, and try to see it from the recommender’s perspective. The other side is the knowledge that to read 189 books in just over 9 months means I have to complete each book in approximately 1.5 days. Pause for a second and read that last sentence again. Each and every book, in 1.5 days.

Keeping that in mind, there are times that even allowing for extra time to read a book, like Faust, I can’t possibly get in depth as the person who recommended it. I read this book in about 4-5 days (in which I should have read it, and two others) and so it completely swamped me.

I really enjoyed the first parts, which is the more well-known of the two parts. The second part, dealing with the ancient Greeks, was much harder to get through because I didn’t have as in-depth a knowledge of Greek mythology. And that speaks to another advantage the recommenders have over the reader. Particularly with academic works, the recommender usually reads them through with their class, so they benefit from the discussion that goes on with their classmates and their teacher. The entire group is able to bring out certain plot points, notable references, and then loop back to earlier passages to combine these elements. Reading alone, it’s hard to tie it all together.

This is all to say that Faust, while certainly an interesting and seminal work, is best read in a group setting. It brought back fond memories of my own high school english courses and taking the time to really delve into the classics. While I enjoy personal reading and this project, there are definitely times where I miss collaborative reading.

Book 24 of 189

Reblogged from librarianreadseverything

librarianreadseverything:

Imagine an all-female cast of On The Road. Add about two hundred pages more philosophical discussion on humanity, individuality, and time. And finally toss a pinch to a handful to a full-on cup of humor. Mix 10 minutes until most of the lumps are gone, then bake for two hours. You will have a fresh, first edition, Even Cowgirls Get the Blues by Tom Robbins.
A really interesting novel, it mixes its elevated philosophy with its irony so you get the message without feeling beat over the head with it. A fun, albeit long, romp along the roads of America right into the Rubber Rose Ranch.
Book 23 of 189

librarianreadseverything:

Imagine an all-female cast of On The Road. Add about two hundred pages more philosophical discussion on humanity, individuality, and time. And finally toss a pinch to a handful to a full-on cup of humor. Mix 10 minutes until most of the lumps are gone, then bake for two hours. You will have a fresh, first edition, Even Cowgirls Get the Blues by Tom Robbins.

A really interesting novel, it mixes its elevated philosophy with its irony so you get the message without feeling beat over the head with it. A fun, albeit long, romp along the roads of America right into the Rubber Rose Ranch.

Book 23 of 189

Reblogged from librarianreadseverything

librarianreadseverything:

The Giver is the softest dystopian future I’ve read. In fact, I’d be hard-pressed to even call it dystopian, when compared to books like The Maze Runner, The Hunger Games, and more closely-related, Brave New World. In the third, society was gentle and without the ravaging conflict of the first two, and so the question becomes, “At what price?” Even 1984, while peaceful, required the heavy hand of government. But Brave New World and The Giver both have progressed to the point where civilization accepts their lots in life, and make the most of it. So we’re left to question whether this gentler, softer version is worth the price of loss of contrast. Is it better to ride the roller coaster or the kiddie train? As I mentioned in my discussion of Brave New World, it’s easy to empathize with the hero and say society is missing out. But once again, with The Giver, I think it’s a question that shouldn’t be so easily dismissed. I look forward to talking with the student who recommended this to hear their thoughts on the proposition offered in The Giver.
Book 22 of 189

librarianreadseverything:

The Giver is the softest dystopian future I’ve read. In fact, I’d be hard-pressed to even call it dystopian, when compared to books like The Maze Runner, The Hunger Games, and more closely-related, Brave New World. In the third, society was gentle and without the ravaging conflict of the first two, and so the question becomes, “At what price?” Even 1984, while peaceful, required the heavy hand of government. But Brave New World and The Giver both have progressed to the point where civilization accepts their lots in life, and make the most of it. So we’re left to question whether this gentler, softer version is worth the price of loss of contrast. Is it better to ride the roller coaster or the kiddie train? As I mentioned in my discussion of Brave New World, it’s easy to empathize with the hero and say society is missing out. But once again, with The Giver, I think it’s a question that shouldn’t be so easily dismissed. I look forward to talking with the student who recommended this to hear their thoughts on the proposition offered in The Giver.

Book 22 of 189

Reblogged from librarianreadseverything