text-mode:

Scott E Fahlman suggests a use of :) and :( in September, 1982. This happened on a bulletin board at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, USA. It caught on pretty fast, and in November there were already several variations.

There are many earlier examples of smilies, but this is likely what popularized emoticons as we know them today.

source + more

And note the proper use of the nose in the smiley face! :-)

Reblogged from mikerugnetta

librarianreadseverything:

A really incredible work that is a wild mix of science and prose. The stories took the science of the world and anthropomorphized it. It’s hard to describe exactly where the attraction of the book came in, but it was tangible throughout. The stories are short enough to make it well worth giving them a try. And, as the student who recommended it wrote so elegantly, “Everyone needs a get-away and Calvino created numerous that makes me want to renounce my Earth citizenship and move to the moon.”
Book 17 of 189

librarianreadseverything:

A really incredible work that is a wild mix of science and prose. The stories took the science of the world and anthropomorphized it. It’s hard to describe exactly where the attraction of the book came in, but it was tangible throughout. The stories are short enough to make it well worth giving them a try. And, as the student who recommended it wrote so elegantly, “Everyone needs a get-away and Calvino created numerous that makes me want to renounce my Earth citizenship and move to the moon.”

Book 17 of 189

Reblogged from librarianreadseverything

Anonymous asked:

I am currently working on college essays and I want to write about how my mom illegally works since she doesn't have a work visa (she is a Canadian citizen) because we would not have enough money, otherwise. Is this wise? Or should I try to find something else to write about? This is a big part of my life, and so I'm finding it difficult to not write about it.

benningtonstudents answered:

While I can see how this would make for a compelling essay, discretion might be the better part of valor in this case.  It’s a tricky thing.  Bennington is not interested in turning your mom in to the feds, nor in penalizing you for your family status.  But depending on the essay itself and how it is received wherever you send it, there could be some risk, either to your mother or to your chances of getting into schools.  I can’t quantify those risks for you.  I just genuinely don’t know what your family might come up against if you put that information on the internet and send it to a bunch of strangers, or how it might be received by colleges.  Once it’s out there, you have no control over how it will be read or by whom.

If it’s essential to you that this aspect of your life is heard, if you need for people to know this about you, consider interviews.  Bennington strongly encourages our applicants to have personal interviews with us, and just generally speaking… in a closed room, with a person you can see and feel out, you can open yourself to the admissions counselors who feel right and be selective about disclosure with the ones where something seems off.  Just be careful, and best of luck to you and your family.

-Ray ‘15

I am secretly (now not so secretly) jealous of Ray’s blogging acumen. Seriously, alternatively factual, joking, but always dead-on informative in whatever style, Ray’s got mad chops at the Tumblr game.

librarianreadseverything:

The best non-fiction books read like fiction. They create a storyline that encourage you to keep turning the page, presenting the facts in an easy-to-digest manner. One of the best recent examples was The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander.
On the other side of the spectrum you have Jim Diamond’s Collapse. This book was just FILLED with minutiae that I often felt was irrelevant to the overall theme. You end up becoming so bogged down into details that by the time Diamond makes his point about a specific society, you stopped caring.
The book has a strong message about the various factors that, in conjunction, can cause the total collapse of a society. And he does an interesting job drawing parallels to modern society. But again, his knowledge of the topic, though vast, is just not matched by his writing ability, and so the book (and the reader) suffers for it.
Book 16 of 189

librarianreadseverything:

The best non-fiction books read like fiction. They create a storyline that encourage you to keep turning the page, presenting the facts in an easy-to-digest manner. One of the best recent examples was The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander.

On the other side of the spectrum you have Jim Diamond’s Collapse. This book was just FILLED with minutiae that I often felt was irrelevant to the overall theme. You end up becoming so bogged down into details that by the time Diamond makes his point about a specific society, you stopped caring.

The book has a strong message about the various factors that, in conjunction, can cause the total collapse of a society. And he does an interesting job drawing parallels to modern society. But again, his knowledge of the topic, though vast, is just not matched by his writing ability, and so the book (and the reader) suffers for it.

Book 16 of 189

Reblogged from librarianreadseverything

librarianreadseverything:

Written 40 years ago, at times this book shows it’s age (referencing the transitioning hippie community, for instance), but much of it remains relevant and strong. Watts does a great job talking through some of Man’s big questions on karma, what comes next, and our place in the world. I found his discussion on (and “proof” of) reincarnation to be particularly enlightening. While not an overly difficult read, it does require some concentration to follow his line of thinking on different ideas. But it definitely opened my eyes and left me with something to mull over when I was finished.
Book 15 of 189

librarianreadseverything:

Written 40 years ago, at times this book shows it’s age (referencing the transitioning hippie community, for instance), but much of it remains relevant and strong. Watts does a great job talking through some of Man’s big questions on karma, what comes next, and our place in the world. I found his discussion on (and “proof” of) reincarnation to be particularly enlightening. While not an overly difficult read, it does require some concentration to follow his line of thinking on different ideas. But it definitely opened my eyes and left me with something to mull over when I was finished.

Book 15 of 189

Reblogged from librarianreadseverything

huntingtonlibrary:

And now, The Huntington’s tumblr is proud to present…

TIMELAPSE GIFS OF THE BLOOOOOOOOOOOOOOM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Photos every 20 min.
Left: Yesterday (8/23), 9:10 a.m. through 4:50 p.m.
Center: Yesterday, 5:10 p.m. through 12:50 a.m. today (8/24).
Right: Today, 1:10 a.m. through 8:50 a.m.

The Corpse Flower, though in the process of closing, is still GORGEOUS and people are flocking in to see it. SO COOL.

Reblogged from runjuliet