librarianreadseverything:

The Librarian Reads Everything Project - Year 2 has now gone live. You can check out the Entire Book List and I’ll be highlighting in yellow the books as I read and review them.

189 books, 307 days.

Oh god.

librarianreadseverything:

I think I’d rather just be ineffective. Whether it’s Eat Mangoes Naked, or Imagine Yourself To A Better Life (made that title up, but sounds like a real one), I just am not really into the self-improvement genre. I think something like, How To Make People Like You The Way You Are, or How To Ignore The Haters is more of my speed. 
Oh, and as a scorecard, I have 0 of the 7 habits, so I am highly effective at not being at all effective. Which has got to be some kind of ineffective record.

librarianreadseverything:

I think I’d rather just be ineffective. Whether it’s Eat Mangoes Naked, or Imagine Yourself To A Better Life (made that title up, but sounds like a real one), I just am not really into the self-improvement genre. I think something like, How To Make People Like You The Way You Are, or How To Ignore The Haters is more of my speed. 

Oh, and as a scorecard, I have 0 of the 7 habits, so I am highly effective at not being at all effective. Which has got to be some kind of ineffective record.

Reblogged from librarianreadseverything

librarianreadseverything:

There are a multitude of reasons that students recommend a specific book. Frequently the plot speaks to them, the message is important, it’s a great theme, or some variation. Less often because it brings back a certain memory, i.e. their father read it to them when they were a child, their mother gave them the book, etc. When I grab a book from the list, I usually try not to look at why the person recommended it, so I can get a fresh sense of the book. But in certain circumstances, I look at what the student said beforehand.
I preface my review because I did just that for this book. I have never read Anne of Green Gables, nor any of the sequels, and this book seemed like the recommendation wasn’t going to be “it’s got a great plot.” What the student noted were the lush descriptions of the scenery, and the simplicity of the stories and the peacefulness.
With those pieces in mind, I absolutely agree. I mean, I’m not going to pick up Anne of Green Gables, or in this case, Anne’s House of Dreams, because I’m going on vacation and need something for the plane. Or I want something while I’m on-line at the store. But this book makes it easy to read. When you open it up, L.M. Montgomery presents a slowed-down version of the world. Anne and her husband are enjoying their new home, sitting back and sipping tea with their neighbors. As a reader, your heart isn’t pumping fast through the thriller. You don’t have to turn on all the lights for a horror. And you’re not learning new things about faraway lands or faraway times. You’re just easing into a comfortable pair of slippers and a soft chair and letting the breeze trickle through the windows. Anne’s House of Dreams will lull you safely into a softer, gentler spot. 
The book doesn’t pretend to be any more than it is - a place to go when you want to hit the “pause” button on life.

librarianreadseverything:

There are a multitude of reasons that students recommend a specific book. Frequently the plot speaks to them, the message is important, it’s a great theme, or some variation. Less often because it brings back a certain memory, i.e. their father read it to them when they were a child, their mother gave them the book, etc. When I grab a book from the list, I usually try not to look at why the person recommended it, so I can get a fresh sense of the book. But in certain circumstances, I look at what the student said beforehand.

I preface my review because I did just that for this book. I have never read Anne of Green Gables, nor any of the sequels, and this book seemed like the recommendation wasn’t going to be “it’s got a great plot.” What the student noted were the lush descriptions of the scenery, and the simplicity of the stories and the peacefulness.

With those pieces in mind, I absolutely agree. I mean, I’m not going to pick up Anne of Green Gables, or in this case, Anne’s House of Dreams, because I’m going on vacation and need something for the plane. Or I want something while I’m on-line at the store. But this book makes it easy to read. When you open it up, L.M. Montgomery presents a slowed-down version of the world. Anne and her husband are enjoying their new home, sitting back and sipping tea with their neighbors. As a reader, your heart isn’t pumping fast through the thriller. You don’t have to turn on all the lights for a horror. And you’re not learning new things about faraway lands or faraway times. You’re just easing into a comfortable pair of slippers and a soft chair and letting the breeze trickle through the windows. Anne’s House of Dreams will lull you safely into a softer, gentler spot. 

The book doesn’t pretend to be any more than it is - a place to go when you want to hit the “pause” button on life.

Reblogged from librarianreadseverything

librarianreadseverything:

You’ve got your old gods - Odin, Ibis, a bunch of others I can’t remember. And they’re brought to America by the people who believed in them. Then you’ve got your new gods - television, media, the Internet. For reasons that I didn’t really catch, they’re going to fight. Okay, so I really like the idea of gods being brought to America by those who believe in them. And I like the idea that Odin and Loki need blood and chaos to live on (though why those particular two, I’m not really sure.) But pretty much the entire rest of the book I’m not really following. What’s with the buffalo headed person? And the thunderbirds and eagle stones? And was Lakeside just a story within the story, or was it necessary to the overall plot?
I don’t know, this is the second Neil Gaiman book I’ve read (Good Omens being the other) and I was not bowled over by either one. Gonna put it in the stack with Dr. Who titled, “Things Tumblr Reveres, That I Just Don’t Get.” The book has a cool concept, but I think Gaiman was smoking too much mescaline when he wrote the book.

librarianreadseverything:

You’ve got your old gods - Odin, Ibis, a bunch of others I can’t remember. And they’re brought to America by the people who believed in them. Then you’ve got your new gods - television, media, the Internet. For reasons that I didn’t really catch, they’re going to fight. Okay, so I really like the idea of gods being brought to America by those who believe in them. And I like the idea that Odin and Loki need blood and chaos to live on (though why those particular two, I’m not really sure.) But pretty much the entire rest of the book I’m not really following. What’s with the buffalo headed person? And the thunderbirds and eagle stones? And was Lakeside just a story within the story, or was it necessary to the overall plot?

I don’t know, this is the second Neil Gaiman book I’ve read (Good Omens being the other) and I was not bowled over by either one. Gonna put it in the stack with Dr. Who titled, “Things Tumblr Reveres, That I Just Don’t Get.” The book has a cool concept, but I think Gaiman was smoking too much mescaline when he wrote the book.

Reblogged from librarianreadseverything